Jessie’s Girl, casually blocked

I finished knitting up Jessie’s Girl – a lovely, simple pattern, with short rows at the shoulders. I needed to make adjustments for my stitch count, so that slowed me down for a bit (lots of pen and paper and ruffled brows) – but it gave me a chance to practice making those adjustments and understanding the pattern better. Short rows are still rather new to me.

The instructions were great, and I enjoyed making it. I lengthened the hem by 10 cm (4 inches), but otherwise followed the instructions for size M (except for my different gauge). I really love patterns that are simple but are still so wearable and lovely. I gave the pattern 5 stars.

The yarn (100% cotton, teal) is of a uniform color – the fluctuations in color are some weird digital artifact. The tee is photographed here inside-out, so you can see some woven in ends. Please disregard! :-)

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No pins (because the cats like them too much) and no blocking wires (because they are way too expensive! They’re just wires! I cannot bring myself to buy them). The garter stitch rows stretched apart very easily, and I like to casually block anyway. I don’t like to go too crazy with blocking or else I will hate doing it.

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Now for the hardest part – waiting for it to dry!

Jessie’s Girl, by Elizabeth Smith

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a hint of summer – completed (April 2015)

I can’t believe I finished it in 2 1/2 weeks.

I made it tunic length, much longer than the pattern calls for (53 cm / 21″ down from armhole instead of 40 cm / 16″).

It’s quite a heavy tee, as the 100% cotton thread is rather dense. I am happy with it! I would love to make another variation of this excellent versatile pattern again soon.

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I had only one skein (50 grams) of the light blue yarn, and obviously it ran out mid-sweater. No worries, I just improvised with some this ginger-brown cotton yarn from my mom’s stash. Improvising and letting go of always being in control is therapeutic for me… And it’s fun, too.

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The pattern calls for a finer yarn, to be knit on larger needles and blocked somewhat open. But I decided to use the cotton yarn I had on hand – in any case, since this is meant to be worn in summertime, I figured a yarn with any wool content just won’t do.

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The hem is a 1×1 rib. The provisional crochet cast on and short rows at the shoulder were cool to learn and use for the first time.

Tell me what you think!

East End Tunic – completed (March 2015)

Sorry for the blurry photo :|

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It ended up being more of a dress than a tunic – I figured I might as well finish all 7 skeins of yarn.
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Looks much better with a finished neckline:

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I didn’t know how to avoid this hole while picking up stitches, so I just fixed it by stitching it up in the end.

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The beginning of the seed stitch is like the pattern instructs, but the rest is improvised.

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See how soft and velvety the fabric is?

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All in all, I’m happy with it, though there are things I’d like to do better next time, and I am sorry to say I prefer more informative pattern instructions than these.

East End (March 2015)

East End is beautiful and simple.

The instructions, on the other hand, were too vague for me.

After knitting up to the V-neck, troubles arose and I frogged it all and started from scratch. I took some time to plan ahead the second time.

testing it out… not too bad!

Once I got to the underarm and put aside the sleeve stitches, things got a LOT easier.

my red East End, 3.5 balls of yarn used so far

Working in the round flowed really fast. It did torque, though, so the decreases are skewed to the side and not nicely symmetric at the back.

The fabric (made of 50% cotton 50% bamboo yarn – Fibra Natura Bamboo Jazz) has a feels velvety and soft and has good drape. I’d like to create a more lightweight fabric in an upcoming project though.